A New Approach To Office Design

Keeping it Flexible

As individual offices become fewer and smaller, walls are coming down. They’re being replaced by open, flexible workspaces that not only encourage collaboration, but allow for multiple uses.

Survey’s conducted indicate that office professionals felt that they perform better at their jobs in well-designed workspaces.  The concept of flexible working has grown in popularity over recent years, with more people working from home, working part-time, consulting or freelancing. In fact, recent data reveals that nearly 50% of workers today consider being able to have a good work-life balance as one of their top priorities when choosing a job.

According to research from Gensler, individual workstations are only occupied 55% of the time at the average workplace.  As more businesses embrace flexible working, there will be a stronger need to rethink how organisations use office space to accommodate the needs of their increasingly dispersed workforce.

Employers with workforces that report feeling distracted, or on-display, in an open-plan office design may need to consider how to incorporate more private areas for focussed work – keeping in mind workers’
needs for both privacy and collaboration when planning office layouts.

Large corporate meeting rooms are likely to become less popular and will be replaced with smaller, video-enabled huddle rooms designed for calls with remote workers. Offices are likely to be designed with movable walls and pop-up meeting rooms.

There is an increasing desire to build flexible gathering spaces in an office building – particularly if you have an amenity like a view or a rooftop – where you can bring clients for meetings or where employees can hang out.

Increasingly absent from these layouts is a separation between boss and employee. Instead, flexible spaces inspire workers to regularly converse, asking for help or guidance on projects – a side effect many employers find increases productivity.

Flexibility also means accommodating different types of workers.  Some might curl up in a lounge chair with their laptops, while others might prefer sitting around a conference room table to collaborate on a project with co-workers.

Employers with workforces that report feeling distracted, or on-display, in an open-plan office design may need to consider how to incorporate more private areas for focussed work – keeping in mind workers’
needs for both privacy and collaboration when planning office layouts.

Large corporate meeting rooms are likely to become less popular and will be replaced with smaller, video-enabled huddle rooms designed for calls with remote workers. Offices are likely to be designed with movable walls and pop-up meeting rooms.

There is an increasing desire to build flexible gathering spaces in an office building – particularly if you have an amenity like a view or a rooftop – where you can bring clients for meetings or where employees can hang out.

Increasingly absent from these layouts is a separation between boss and employee. Instead, flexible spaces inspire workers to regularly converse, asking for help or guidance on projects – a side effect many employers find increases productivity.

Flexibility also means accommodating different types of workers.  Some might curl up in a lounge chair with their laptops, while others might prefer sitting around a conference room table to collaborate on a project with co-workers.